Iditarod Preparation

The Iditarod, often called the last great race, is perhaps the most famous dog sled race. Mushers run their dog teams from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska, over 1,000 miles though some of the most wild terrain left in this country. It is a race of determination, strength and perseverance. But unlike other endurance events, the Iditarod is about more than just the competitors, it is about the dogs who get them there.

Rainy Pass Lodge is one of the many check points along the Iditarod trail. Not only will we get a first hand view of this exciting event, but we will also be a part of the fleet of volunteers who make this race possible.

Only one problem, I know nothing about sled dogs or the Iditarod…

Iditarod Books

Iditarod Books

Winterdance: The fine madness of running the Iditarod
By Gary Paulsen
Gary Paulsen describes how he decided to run the Iditarod, his relationship with his dogs and a section by section description of the trail. He shares his personal account of what it was like to run the Iditarod as a rookie and that it is what you don’t know that can make or break your race. He tells his story with laugh out loud humor while still portraying the brutal reality of running the Iditarod.

Winning the Iditarod: The GB Jones Story
By GB Jones
GB Jones describes his numerous experiences on the Iditarod trail in a very personal way. He shows how the dogs are the true heros of this race and how even though he never finished in first place, simply making it to Nome made him a winner.

Graveyard of Dreams: Dashed hopes and shattered aspirations along Alaska’s Iditarod Trail
By Craig Medred
Craig Medred shares the stories of many mushers who hoped to win the elusive belt buckle given to every finisher of the Iditarod trail. He demonstrates how elusive that buckle can be by telling harrowing stories of snow storms, -50 degree cold, breaking through sea ice and the harsh reality that some teams just don’t have what it takes to make it to Nome.

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2 thoughts on “Iditarod Preparation

  1. Pingback: Alaska Travelling with Iditarod huskies and fishermen | tiggerrenewing

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